Tiger Woods’ former caddie Steve Williams has revealed he is to come out of retirement.

According to a report by Evin Priest for Golf Digest, the New Zealander will reunite with Adam Scott, who won his only major at the 2013 Masters with Williams on the bag.

The 58-year-old will caddie for Scott for the next two weeks at the Australian PGA Championship and Australian Open.

He is expected to share duties going forward with Scott’s regular looper Greg Hearmon.

“For me it’s exciting to work again with Steve and see if we can rediscover the magic,” Scott told Priest.

“As a player, you experience different points in your career. Right now on the PGA Tour is a time of change, and I’m adjusting to it. Having Steve and Greg doing a job share is going to help me get everything I need and that’s to be fresh at the biggest events.

“My goal is to win majors; I had a good run with Steve in the majors and we did win the Masters, but it’s about getting an overall balance for what I need to perform in the biggest events.


“Steve is at a point in his life where he’d like to have a dabble again, so to speak. It’s a good balance for him because it won’t be a full year’s grind.”

Scott and Williams initially joined forces after the latter split with Woods in 2011. The Kiwi retired in 2017 after more than 40 years which also included stints on the bags of Greg Norman, Raymond Floyd and Ian Baker-Finch.

However, he has filled in for the likes of Jason Day and Ryan Fox. “Steve is at a point in his life where he’d like to have a dabble again, so to speak. It’s a good balance for him because it won’t be a full year’s grind.”

Scott and Williams initially joined forces after the latter split with Woods in 2011. The Kiwi retired in 2017 after more than 40 years which also included stints on the bags of Greg Norman, Raymond Floyd and Ian Baker-Finch.

However, he has filled in for the likes of Jason Day and Ryan Fox.

He is returning to the bag with the aim of helping his charge to an elusive second major.

“The time I spent caddying for Adam was very memorable; helping him becoming the first Australian to win at Augusta,” Williams said.

“I feel Adam is in a good shape with his game, and I’m fresh having not caddied for a few years, so I’ll bring a lot of enthusiasm.

“I’ve always said to Adam and to others, to be remembered as one of the great players, you have to win multiple majors. The opportunity to try and get Adam major No.2 and elevate himself to a special group of players in history, would be a privilege.”

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